FAMU students “Strikeout” against police brutality

 Unity dance team prepared  for their  routine  at the peak of the event. Photos by Nadia Felder

Unity dance team prepared for their routine at the peak of the event.
Photos by Nadia Felder

 

FAMU students posed for a photo during  an intermission.

FAMU students posed for a photo during an intermission.

 

 

By Nadia Felder
Outlook Writer

There are many ways to protest against police brutality, whether joining a rally, posting controversial hashtags, wearing T-shirts with slogans like ‘Justice’ or ‘Straight Outta Patience’ or even conducting a showcase, like students at Florida A&M University (FAMU).

 
FAMU’s Student Government Association (SGA) hosted the annual Strikeout Showcase in Gaither Gym on Dec. 3, with a prominent theme of “Striking out police brutality.”
When the doors opened at 7p.m., FAMU students walked into what once was a familiar gym, to now a huge performance stage with colorful stage lights giving attendees the feel of a live concert.

 
FAMU students had the chance to enjoy performances from individuals and student organizations that showcased their talent around the issue of police brutality.

 
Some students showcased their talents through poetry like JB Stephenson who recited a poem regarding social injustices and Rayquan “King Quan” Johnson who rapped his song highlighting the challenges of being a young Black man in America. Even dance squads such as Unity Dance and House Arrest II cranked the crowd with their segment as performers reenacted incidents of police harassment through Hip-Hop.

 

 

Senior Public Relations student Leah Wilson said SGA did a superb job executing the message.

 
“I’ve been waiting for FAMU to have something like this,” said Wilson. “A lot of students are not aware of how serious police brutality is. This event shined that light.”
All student acts led to the closing performance by R&B singer, songwriter and actor Omarion, who believed events like the Strikeout is exactly what the public needs to start the conversation about police brutality.

 
Omarion mentioned in an interview before the show the advice he would give to a young Black man who could potentially avoid police harassment would be to “equip yourself with knowledge, know what’s up and know the law.”


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